HIGH! CANADA'S GUIDE to Cannabis-Infused Edibles

November 12, 2015

 

The first thing to remember is the cannabis industry is in its infancy.

 

Due to the plant’s federal illegality, cannabis products are not subjected to Federal Health regulations.

 

This means two things: First, a lack of standard rules means a lack of consistency from one product to another. Secondly, no one is really checking what's going into the products you're consuming.

 

Many of us new to cannabis-infused foods (also known as "edibles") fall victim to the same mistake: we eat too much too fast. Edibles are a great choice for patients when consumed responsibly; they're potent and body-focused, meaning they're perfect for people who suffer from pain, nausea, or lack of appetite. Go too hard on the edibles and you will know it, Maybe not right away but that second hour in may be a little hard to handle even for an experienced cannabis user.

 

The lack of industry consistency can make finding the correct dose even more difficult.

Remember to read the label to figure out the correct portion size for the dose that works best for you. Finding products with clearly labeled packaging can also be a bit of a challenge, especially in regions where the industry has only just started.

 

When trying to find the best medible for you, look for products that have a clear label and are properly packaged. Support companies that have taken the initiative to create clearly labeled, quality packaging for their products, as they're taking extra steps to ensure their products are consistent, safe, and honest.

 

Metabolizing cannabis makes the effects much stronger. Edibles are typically made with highly concentrated cannabis, be it in actual concentrate form (hash oil), cannabis-infused butter, or infused oil. This means that is incredibly easy to overdo it. Between the time it takes for the cannabis to kick in and the highly concentrated levels of THC found in many edibles, finding the correct dose can be quite the chore.

 

It is best to consider 10mg is a ‘dose.’

 

Consider this like one beer; this amount will affect some people a lot, and others not at all.

Take your time and learn what is right for you.

 

While no one has ever reportedly died from cannabis overconsumption, consuming too much cannabis can mean that what was once a fun evening can turn into a pretty bad time. Eating the entire cannacookie may seem like a good idea, but many times a single product may actually be considered two or more doses of medicine.

 

When it comes to edibles, it’s best to taste and wait for a while before gorging yourself on potent and delicious treats.

 

 

Another important factor is whether you consumed the edible on an empty stomach or after you've already eaten. An empty stomach will feel the effects much more quickly, while a full stomach won't hit you as hard. In order to avoid feeling uncomfortable when eating an infused product, you may want to take this advice: “Eat a meal, and then try an edible. Not vice versa. Food doesn’t have the same effect for edibles as it does for alcohol. If you feel like you have taken too much, eating a meal can actually push more into your system rather than dilute what’s already there.”

 

When you smoke or vaporize cannabis, you feel the effects of the herb almost instantly. You’re also able to tell exactly how much cannabis you have consumed and you can easily decide when you've had too much. When you eat (or drink) activated cannabis, these signals go away. 

 

After eating a medible, your body needs to digest and metabolize the food before you feel the effects. 

 

The amount of time it takes for the effects to kick in also depends on your metabolism. People with faster metabolisms may feel medicated after an hour, yet people with slower metabolisms may not feel the effects for two hours or more.

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